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Posts Tagged ‘cs osborne’

Feb 7th,2010 – Leather Knives for Sale

February 7th, 2011
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    I am listing some more knives for sale on my website today. These are all various makers and patterns of round and head knives for cutting leather. Some are over 100 years old and others are quite recent. They have all been sharpened and used by me for a few days each to insure they are the kind of knives I would personally use.  

CS Osborne 5 inch Round Knife

CS Osborne 5 inch Round Knife

   I have received two CS Osborne round knives with the Newark marking on them recently. These are over 100 years old. They are identical to each other and in very good condition. The old steel in the Osbornes is good and these knives a re a fine example of the old time care that went into making tools for the professional worker. These knives were valued for their performance and not their price.  

Gomph 3-1/2 inch Round Knife

Gomph 3-1/2 inch Round Knife

The Gomph name is synonymous with old line quality leather tools and especially knives. I have a nice larger Gomph  round knife and two smaller one for sale on the website. These are all quality knives and again, great old steel. 

Custom Maker Round Knife

Custom Maker Round Knife

Custom Maker Philadelphia/"Odd" Pattern Head Knife

Custom Maker Philadelphia/"Odd" Pattern Head Knife

I also have two pretty unmarked knives that were no doubt made by a custom knife maker who knew what he was doing. These have good steel and sold handles.  One is kind of the standard round knife shape. The other is referred to as a “Phildelphia pattern” head knife  or more correctly to some an “Odd Pattern” head knife.  The pointed tips make for  quick turns and skiving or undercutting inside curves easier than the standard round knife shape. I wouldn’t be without one.

To view these and other tools I have for sale, please follow this link – Leather Tools for Sale

Thanks,

Bruce

www.brucejohnsonleather.com

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January 22nd,2010 – Osborne Draw Gauges For Sale

January 22nd, 2011
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  I have added two draw gauges for sale to my website. These are both made by CS Osborne and are marked with the Newark NJ address, so they are over 100 years old. In 1906 Osborne moved to Harrison, New Jersey. A few condition notes on both. They both have four inch bars and are in excellent condition. All of the shims and gibs are present. The blades are replacements and have been sharpened beyond the condition they ship in. The markings on both bars are very strong. 

CS Osborne Steel Frame Draw Gauge

CS Osborne Steel Frame Draw Gauge

  This draw gauge has a steel frame and wood scale handles. The handles are tight with no defects. The condition is way beyond the average you usually see these.

CS Osborne Brass Frame Draw Gauge

CS Osborne Brass Frame Draw Gauge Right Side View of CS Osborne Brass Draw Gauge

Right Side View of CS Osborne Brass Draw Gauge

Right Side View of CS Osborne Brass Draw Gauge

 

This CS Osborne draw gauge has a brass frame with a wooden infill. It likewise is in excellent condition, and the wood is as pretty as I have seen.

     To view these and other tools I have for sale, please follow this hyper link to my main website – Leather Tools For Sale .

Thanks,

Bruce

www.brucejohnsonleather.com

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Oct 19th, 2010 – Rose and Shapleigh Leather Knives – plus leather creasers, edgers and ticklers for sale

October 20th, 2010
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I have added several more hand tools to my website tonight. I have included some examples here, but added a lot more to my website.  The highlights are that I have added a very nice Wm Rose round knife. The Rose knives are almost legendary for their ability to hold an edge , and about as notorious for the work it takes to get that edge. They were made and sold up until about the period of the first world war, and the steel used was some of the best ever put in a knife. I have also added a nice Shapleigh knife too. It is another old line company that sold quality tools to folks who worked for a living at the trade.

William Rose Round Knife

William Rose Round Knife

 

Shapleigh Diamond Edge Round Knife

Shapleigh Diamond Edge Round Knife

 

I am also listing some ticklers ( which are also known as freehand creases). One of these is historic. It is legibly marked “J English”. Joseph English was listed as a toolmaker in 1826 and sold out to William Dodd in 1856. I am also listing an HF Osborne and some CS Osbornes as well. HF Osborne was brother to CS Osborne. HF was  in business from the 1870s until he sold out to his brother CS Osborne in 1905. CS Osborne began in the tool business under his name in 1861 and the business still continues today. The older HF and CS Osborne tools were again made in the era when the men who bought these tools were tradesmen and depended on reliable tools for their livelihood.

Joseph English leather tickler

Joseph English leather tickler

 

HF Osborne #2 Leather Tickler

HF Osborne #2 Leather Tickler

 

CS Osborne Leather Ticklers in two sizes and styles

CS Osborne Leather Ticklers in two sizes and styles

 

I have some nice edgers again – Gomph and CS Osbornes, along with a set of four numbered but not maker marked edgers. That set is sure nice to use, especially on strapwork.

Gomph #1 round bottom edger

Gomph #1 round bottom edger

 

Sizes 1-2-3-4 edgers

Sizes 1-2-3-4 edgers

 

Finally, I have several creasers for sale too. Some are single line edge creasers and some are double line creasers. I have them from Gomph, HF Osborne, and CS Osborne.

HF Osborne #4 Single Edge Creaser

HF Osborne #4 Single Edge Creaser

 

Gomph #2 and #3 single Edge Creasers

Gomph #2 and #3 single Edge Creasers

 

CS Osborne #4 Single Edge Creaser

CS Osborne #4 Single Edge Creaser

 

Again I would like to thank everyone who reads this blog. I would like to especially thank the people who have taken time to write and call me regarding tools they have questions about, or knowledge to share. Finally, thanks to everyone who has bought tools from me  and the feedback I have received. Your business is appreciated. To see more tools I have available, please follow this link to my main website here – http://brucejohnsonleather.com/content/index.php/leather_tools_for_sale/ .

Thanks again, Bruce

www.brucejohnsonleather.com

Sept 26th, 2010 – Round Knives, Overstitchers, and Edgers Added to “Leather Tools for Sale”

September 26th, 2010
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I have added several tools to my “Leather Tools for Sale” page on my website. Rather than individual descriptions, I am going to show thumbnail pictures. Please click on any of interest to see them in a bigger size. For more descriptions and pictures , please follow the link at the bottom of the post to my main website. Thanks for looking ! 

I have added several knives ranging from unmarked using knives to higher end end knives. I have personally used all of these knives for a while each to make sure they are the real deal. They are all sharpened and ready to use. Here are a few examples.

 

Gomph Round Knife - 4-1/4 Inch

Gomph Round Knife - 4-1/4 Inch

Gomph Round Knife - 6 inch

Gomph Round Knife - 6 inch

CS Osborne Star Round Knife

CS Osborne Star Round Knife

 

Clyde Round Knife

Clyde Round Knife

  

I have also added some nice Gomph round bottome edgers. These are sizes 1, 2, and 4.
Gomph Round Bottom Edgers - set of 1, 2, and 4

Gomph Round Bottom Edgers - set of 1, 2, and 4

There are also some very nice square shank CS Osborne overstitchers. I have a set of 5,6, and 7. To add to them I have separate set of 8/9, and 10. Then I have a very rare #16 for sale as a single.
CS Osborne Overstitchers - Set of 5,6, and 7

CS Osborne Overstitchers - Set of 5,6, and 7

CS Osborne Overstitchers - set of 8, 9, and 10.

CS Osborne Overstitchers - set of 8, 9, and 10.

CS Osborne #16 Overstitcher

CS Osborne #16 Overstitcher

 There is also a #7 roundshank Osborne overstitcher, a straight channeler, a very nice angled channeler, and a small screw crease.

 

CS Osborne # 7 overstitcher

CS Osborne # 7 overstitcher

CS Osborne Straight Channeler

CS Osborne Straight Channeler

CS Osborne Angled Channeler

CS Osborne Angled Channeler

CS Osborne small screwcrease

CS Osborne small screwcrease

Thank you very much for reading, and for more tools and  information please follow this link to my main website page of leather tools – http://brucejohnsonleather.com/content/index.php/leather_tools_for_sale/
Bruce

June 6th, 2010 – Old and New Leather Tools For Sale

June 6th, 2010
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Tonight I am adding a few more leather tools for sale. Thanks for those who have bought listed tools, and to the ones who have contacted me and bought tools I hadn’t listed yet also. Today I am adding a a hammer and a couple sets of pliers.

CS Osborne #10 Cantle Pliers

CS Osborne #10 Cantle Pliers

 

This is a duplicate set of pliers for me.  These are the #10 pattern cantle pliers from CS Osborne. When you get these pliers new, the corners and edges are sharp. They will leave marks on your damp leather. These came from a young guy who didn’t get the message from the old timers about grinding the points off the corners and rounding over the edges. He bought a set from another maker and these came with some other tools he traded to me.  I rounded these up and used them off and on, but don’t need two sets. They are priced at $35.

Horseshoe Brand Crispin style Leather Hammer

Horseshoe Brand Crispin style Leather Hammer

 

It is no secret that Jeremiah Watt at Horse Shoe Brand sells some pretty tools. This is another tool that is a duplicate for me. Jeremiah’s Crispin style hammer has some nice features besides the engraved pattern. The face is flat so it doesn’t leave dimples like the ones with a dome face will do. I like it for tapoffs too. The tail is broad and smooth. I use the tail for pressing and working wrinkles down on swell covers on saddles. Handy hammer to have on hand. Priced at $40.

Whitcher "A" Lasting Pliers

Whitcher "A" Lasting Pliers

Whitcher "A" Lasting Pliers - Jaws
Whitcher “A” Lasting Pliers – Jaws
Witcher "A" Lasting Pliers Anvil

Witcher "A" Lasting Pliers Anvil

This is a really nice set of Whitcher “A” lasting pliers. They are clena and don’t appear to have had much use. There is no play in the jaws. The anvil is nice and crisp with no dents or dings from hitting nails. The jaws mesh like they should and these are in great condition – price – $25.
       To see more tools I have for sale on website – you can click on the link here – http://brucejohnsonleather.com/content/index.php/leather_tools_for_sale/
Thanks for reading, and thanks again to buyers and callers.
Bruce
     

May 12th – 2010 – Some More Leather Tools for Sale

May 12th, 2010
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I have added a few more tools to my website page of leather tools for sale – http://brucejohnsonleather.com/content/index.php/leather_tools_for_sale/ . There is a preview of them here -

Vergez-Blanchard Plough Gauge

Vergez-Blanchard Plough Gauge

This is a Vergez-Blanchard plough gauge I recently got. It is the most precision made, prettiest plough gauge I have used. It is the 10 cm model and just a joy to use. The blade is all but new, and the first real sharpening it has seen was done by me. It is ready to go to work.

Vergez-Blanchard angled skiving knife

Vergez-Blanchard angled skiving knife

I got a whole set of Vergez-Blanchard knives with the plough gauge. This is the first I sharpened and it is a dandy. These are the first Vergez-Blanchard tools I have used, and I am really impressed. This skiver just glides through heavy leather and is comfortable to run.

CS Osborne one piece bag or slot punches

CS Osborne one piece bag or slot punches

This is a set of three CS Osborne one piece slot punches. Some folks call them bag punches. These are in very good condition and punch and clear easily. They are sized 5/8, 1 inch, and 1-3/8 inches.

  Thanks for reading!  For prices and additonal pictures – click the link here to see them and other tools on my website – http://brucejohnsonleather.com/content/index.php/leather_tools_for_sale/ .

Thanks,

Bruce

www.brucejohnsonleather.com

Vintage Leather Tools for Sale – March 28th, 2010

March 28th, 2010
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      I am going to list a few of the old tools I have available for sale on my website, and introduce them here.  Since I put up the blog posts last year I get a couple offers a week from someone with tools to sell. We also antique when we travel, and occasionally I will find something that way. I have passed on buying anything I already had a duplicate of, but am starting to get enough inquiries I am going to start listing a few available for sale. Some of these are tools I have used personally, and others are ones I have bought and gone through. I am not selling anything I haven’t or wouldn’t use myself.  There are going to be more details and in depth descriptions on my website in a section on tools for sale.  That said, here are the intial offerings.

American Model B Leather Crank Skiver

American Model B Leather Crank Skiver

 

This American Model B leather skiver came from a good friend of mine. He has been in the leather business a long time and has used about every machine out there. He does some of the best refurbishing of thesde old bench machines you will find. It is priced at $250.

J Dixon Leather Plough Gauge

J Dixon Leather Plough Gauge

 

  This is a nice Dixon plough gauge used for cutting leather strips. Plough gauges are popular with European trained leather workers. I really like to use plough gauges, and this one is ready to go. It is priced at $250.

HF Osborne Latta Pattern Leather Draw Gauge

HF Osborne Latta Pattern Leather Draw Gauge

 

  Another tools used to cut strips is a draw gauge. Draw gauges seem to be more popular with American leather workers. This one has some history. HF Osborne was a brother to CS Osborne – another tool maker that is still in business. This is the Latta pattern style. The handle twists to release the pressure on the bar to adjust the width. This tool is over 105 years old, and still tight and very functional. It is priced at $120.

Clyde Leather Round Knife

Clyde Leather Round Knife

This Clyde round knife is in almost new condition. It has been one of my users, but I have more than enough on the bench, and someone is going to be really happy with this knife. Price – $90.

CS Osborne XX leather round knife

CS Osborne XX leather round knife

Here’s another round knife I have used enough to give a fair assessment of it. This is a round knife from CS Osborne with the XX impression and Newark address. CS Osborne moved from Newark to Harrison NJ in 1906 or so. Another tool over 100 years old, with good steel. The long belly of the sides make it great for long straight cuts and especially skiving. It is priced at $90.

CS OSborne #6 Overstitch Tool

CS OSborne #6 Overstitch Tool

 This is a nice CS Osborne overstitcher. It is a #6 and there is no play in the wheel. A nice using tool – $20.

For more information, please check the listings on my website – www.brucejohnsonleather.com

Thanks,

Bruce

July 28 – Draw gauges and a Plough Gauge

July 28th, 2009
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        This has been another week with a lot of repairs, a few routine things, and I started another saddle. Not much to show as work in progress of interest. There was a lot of interest in the post on leather splitters, and I appreciate that. In that vein, I am going to head to another area of interest – strap cutters. I really didn’t start out to be a collector of draw gauges, but one of our past times is visiting antique stores when we travel. Occasionally we run across some old leather tools, and draw gauges are not an uncommon find in the old tool collections.  Most all of mine but one have come from antique stores. 

         Draw gauges are a leather tool used to cut straps. The upright blade on the left side cuts the strap, and the handle acts as the “fence” to keep the width even. The width is adjusted by the ruled bar sliding back and forth, and secured with a screw in the front of the handle is most cases.  As I got more draw gauges, I left them set to different common widths I would cut. To use it, the  gauge is pulled into the strap and continued to pull through the leather. One issue is that the blade and fence must be parallel or the cut will wander from the set width. Another issue is that the further the blade is from the handle, the more torque there is on your hand to keep it tracking true. The blade must be very sharp to prevent that drag also. Some blades have a small handle on them, and you can put your left hand under there on the handle to then pull with both hands and keep it tracking true in harder leather. Like any cutting tool, these can be a bit dangerous if you are not careful. Sharp blades and being aware where that blade is going will minimize that. I was taught to hold mine with my thumb on the left side of the handle to keep the leather pressed down between the blade and the handle to keep it tracking. My index finger is pointed forward along the right side of the handle to help guide it. My middle finger is around the trigger (if present) and my last two fingers wrap the handle. There are other ways, but this is how I was shown, and what works for me.

I will kind of go through some of my more unique draw gauges in order of age -  probable oldest first.

The side view of the Francis and Ward draw gauge.

The side view of the Francis and Ward draw gauge.

Francis & Ward brass frame top view.

Francis & Ward brass frame top view.

      Francis and Ward was founded  in Newark NJ in 1856. Johns Ward was listed as a cutler from 1856-1859. One of the unique things about this draw gauge is the smaller handle size and no trigger. The early draw gauge designs appeared to not have the trigger as part of the frame.

Henry Sauerbier draw gauge

Henry Sauerbier draw gauge

 

  Henry Sauerbier was listed in Newark NJ in 1848. I have read that he made swords for the Civil War, and as time progressed his sons joined the business. The Sauerbier draw gauge has a small “spur” trigger. Of all my draw gauges, this one fits my hand the best. It is my favorite. Pretty cool to be cutting leather with a tool that could be 160 years old.

HF Osborne Latta pattern draw gauge right side

HF Osborne Latta pattern draw gauge right side

HF Osborne Latta pattern draw gauge left side view

HF Osborne Latta pattern draw gauge left side view

    HF Osborne was a brother of CS Osborne. He left CS Osborne to start his own comapny in Newark NJ in 1877. Are you seeing the pattern for Newark NJ here? There must have been tool makers on every corner. A lot of other tools were made there also. This is called the Latta pattern or twist handle draw gauge. The bar on the other styles is secured by the thumb screw on the front of the handle. The Latta pattern draw gauges have the screw mechanism in the handle the handle is twisted counterclockwise to loosen and the bar is adjusted to width. The handle is then twist back clockwise and the screw in the end of the handle puts a bind on the bar. The two screws in the front of the handle are used to true up the bar by adjusting one screw or the other. They also can be screwed in or out to control the bind from the handle and allow the handle to twist to be flush and square with the front of the frame. I kind of like this adjustment method. Interesting to remember that these were pretty much made by hand and each frame handle and bar were mated up to work correctly together. Many of the old draw gauges were match number stamped on the handle and frame to ensure the right parts were put together for the best result. For that reason, some of the old parts are not interchangable from one to the next.

CS Osborne draw gauge - brass frame with screw-in trigger

CS Osborne draw gauge - brass frame with screw-in trigger

  This is Newark (that city again!) NJ  draw gauge made by CS Osborne. This one has a brass frame with wooden inserts in the handles as many of the old ones do. The interesting factor with this one is the trigger is screwed in. I don’t know what time frame this was, but suspect it was late 1800s. Like the handles on the Latta pattern, these triggers are not interchangable. They must screw in and bind in the correct orientation to the frame.

CS Osborne Newark draw gauge with steel frame

CS Osborne Newark draw gauge with steel frame

 Here is one of the larger handled draw gauges I have. It was made by CS Osborne in Newark. It has a steel frame with the wooden inserts, and the trigger is cast as part of the frame.

Steel handle CS Osborne with 6" bar and USA stamp

Steel handle CS Osborne with 6" bar and USA stamp

This is another CS Osborne draw gauge but more recent. It is marked with the Harrison NJ stamp. CS Osborne bought out HF Osborne in 1905, and moved the operation to Harrison NJ in 1906, where they still produce tools today. This one is a little different in that it has a 6″ bar. It is also stamped USA on the bottom of the bar. This was produced for the United States Army and was issued to the cobblers and saddlers/harness makers. I have heard some differing stories on some of these. One is that the steel hadled 6″ bar gauges were issued to the cobblers, and the 6″ bar gauges with steel and wood insert handles were issued in the saddler’s chests. If anybody knows for sure, please post a comment. As an aside, these chests were pretty neat. Desigined to pack on a mule, and keep the tools organized inside. They had slots for legs to be inserted and set of jaws to make up a “stitching horse” for field repairs.

Bransley Plough Gauge rear view

Bransley Plough Gauge rear view

Barnsley Plough Gauge - angle view

Barnsley Plough Gauge - angle view

 

Alright, so I have some neat old antique draw gauges that I can use. Here’s something a little different. Plough gauges are traditionally used by leather workers with a more European influence. A friend and I were talking and neither of us have seen any versions that were made in the United States. Earlier this spring I had the opportunity vist my friend Giovanni Zapeta at his shop. He was trained by an English saddler and harnessman. Giovanni had a couple plough gauges and allowed me to try one. The learning curve to use a plough gauge seems to be about one strap. My Australian transplant friend likewise swears by his. His quote was that “Once you use a plough gauge, you won’t want to pick up a draw gauge”. Basically the design of the plough gauge is the opposite of the draw gauge. The blade is inline with the handle and pushed. This eliminates the torque associated the draw gauge. The front of the blade is sharpened. The fence is adjustable and to the left of the blade. The fence and blade are longer than the blade and handle guide of the draw gauge, so the plough gauge tends to not waver as much. There is a roller to keep the leather from ridng up the blade, as opposed to using your thumb on the draw gauge. Finally the handle is up, not under the leather like the draw gauge. Your leather can remain on the cutting table, not hanging over the edge like you do with a draw gauge.

         I found an old Barnsley with a cracked but solid handle on an ebay bargain a few months ago. I will get around to having a new handle put on it. The blade is all but unused. I am thinking this one is an oldie because there are matching numbers on the fence and bar of the frame. After using it, my Aussie friend is right, I have not really picked up a draw gauge except occasionally since I got it. The real downside to plough gauges is the price. New ones are selling here in the US for around $650. When they do show up, the used ones usually sell for at least 4 times what a draw gauge goes for. My experience is they are worth it if you have many straps to do.

     Again, I appreciate the comments and private emails about the splitters, and I hope you enjoy the strap cutters as well.

Bruce

www.brucejohnsonleather.com